Texas State Aquarium Released Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk

Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk released
Loading

Second ChancesThe Aquarium is happy to announce that we released a Red-Tailed Hawk back into its natural habitat at Hazel Bazemore Park earlier this morning!

The Aquarium’s Second Chances Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital took in the juvenile raptor February 11, when a local woman discovered the injured hawk near Allison Point Road and brought it to the facility.

Upon inspection, Second Chances staff discovered the young hawk was dehydrated and had a broken clavicle and coracoid, two vital shoulder bones that inhibit flying if fractured. Surgery was performed by Aquarium Veterinarian Dr. David Stelling to pin the bones back together. The major surgery required slow conditioning and physical therapy by staff. The young hawk steadily progressed in its rehabilitation, moving from low perches to higher ones, eventually regaining its ability to fly.

Throughout its recovery, staff carefully monitored the mending of hawk’s injuries and encouraged appropriate eating habits. All were excited to see the healed hawk return to its natural habitat.

Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk released

Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk released

Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk released

Rehabilitated Red-tailed Hawk released

Texas State Aquarium Saddened Loss of Fish Species

tsalogo2
Loading

The Texas State Aquarium is saddened to report the loss of approximately 400 marine fish.  These fish inhabited several large habitats, including the Islands of Steel exhibit and the Flower Gardens exhibit. In an attempt to control a particularly difficult parasite that had proven resistant to other treatments, staff administered a different, commonly used drug. The fish in the affected exhibits had an adverse reaction to the medication. Staff members worked diligently throughout the night to save as much of the collection as possible, but considerable losses were sustained.

The majority of the Aquarium’s animal collection was not impacted. The Living Shores gallery, Nearshore gallery, Amazon, and Floating Phantoms, as well as a number of smaller exhibits, were not affected. None of the freshwater aquariums, and none of the touch tanks were impacted. In addition, none of the outdoor exhibits such as Tortuga Cay and Texas Trails were affected.  The loss represents about 13 percent of the Aquarium’s overall collection.

As a standard precaution, staff had tested the treatment on an individual smaller exhibit with no adverse reaction prior to administering it into the larger exhibit.

The Aquarium’s first priority is to focus on stabilizing the water in the affected exhibits. The Aquarium has sent water samples from affected exhibits to testing laboratories in hopes of a clear explanation for what caused the adverse reaction.

“This is a very sad day at the Texas State Aquarium,” remarked Aquarium Chief Marketing Officer Richard E. Glover, Jr. “We are working diligently to find out what caused the adverse reaction, and we will keep the public informed with any updates.”