Dollar Day

Loading

Image

Texas State Aquarium Announces Dollar Day

Presented by Reliant on Sunday, December 8

 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS – For just a dollar, dive into marine fun for a day. The Texas State Aquarium announced today that Dollar Day presented by Reliant will return for the third year. On Dollar Day, the Texas State Aquarium offers $1 admission for all visitors. This year’s event will be on Sunday, Dec. 8. Along with the special price, there will be an enhanced schedule of programs for the event. Reliant will provide a free gift to the first 3,000 Dollar Day visitors.

 

“The Texas State Aquarium brings together families to experience the world beneath the Gulf of Mexico,” said Elizabeth Killinger, president of Reliant. “Supporting Dollar Day is one of the ways Reliant gives back to the Corpus Christi community, creating opportunities for families to learn more, and care more, about marine wildlife and maybe one of the young Dollar Day visitors will decide to become a marine biologist or science teacher as a result of their experience on December 8.”

 

Aquarium President and CEO Tom Schmid said, “We are so pleased to have Reliant return as our partner for our December 2013 Dollar Day. Our Dollar Days are a long-standing tradition for the aquarium and are a great benefit for our community. We are thankful for the support corporate partners like Reliant provide to help make them possible.”

 

The aquarium will maintain its normal operating hours for the day, opening at 9 a.m. and closing at 5 p.m. Children 2 years old and under will receive free admission. Parking is $5.

 

Texas State Aquarium–Connecting people with nature and inspiring conservation of the Gulf of Mexico.

The Aquarium is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums

and the Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks and Aquariums.

www.texasstateaquarium.org

Dolphin Response

Loading

Image

 

 Q: How long does it take a dolphin to learn a new trick?

 

 A: Dolphins all learn at different rates. So it really depends on the animal, as well as the complexity of the behavior. Some more ‘simple’ behaviors, such as a wave or a head nod, may take only a few training sessions. While other, more complex behaviors, such as a front flip, may take a few months to train.

Red-Bellied Piranha

Loading

redbelliedpirahna3

It’s a Piranha!

Did you know?
The Red-Bellied Piranha is often thought of as aggressive and ferocious, because of their sharp teeth and feeding frenzies (when a large group of Piranhas join together to strip a large item of prey within minutes). However, this behavior is not common, and is usually a result of starvation or provocation.

You can find Red-Bellied Piranhas in the Texas State Aquarium’s Amazon exhibit!

Information gathered from sources including Arkive.org.

Sea Turtle

Loading

Sea Turtle

This is a Sea Turtle!

The five sea turtle species that are found in the gulf are the Loggerhead, Hawksbill, Kemp’s Ridley, Green, and Leatherback.

Did you know? Male Kemp’s Ridleys never come ashore. Female Kemp’s Ridleys only come ashore during nesting season: April-July.
A Kemp’s Ridley nest may have around 100 eggs. Females may lay 9 nests in a season. The temperature inside the nest determines male or female hatchlings!

The Texas State Aquarium is an official home for rehabilitated sea turtles. We provide care for sea turtles that cannot be released. Our education programs help you discover ways to make the oceans safer for all marine life.

Each positive action we take for wildlife helps us too!

You can leave the beach cleaner than when you got there. Help pick up and “pitch in” to keep sea turtles and other marine life from eating trash.

Clownfish

Loading

Clownfish

This is a Clownfish!

Did you know?
All Clownfish begin their lives as males. “If the dominant female dies, the largest male will change into a female and a non-dominant male will take his place as the new dominant male. This process, known as ‘protandrous hermaphrorditism’, allows the group of clownfish to remain self-sufficient, as when the dominant female dies the male does not need to search for a new mate.”

Clownfish are the only fish known to be able to live amongst the tentacles of anemones. The tentacles of the anemones normally sting other fish, but clownfish excrete a mucus over their skin that tricks the anemone into believing it is touching itself, so it does not sting. They live harmoniously in a symbiotic relationship.

Information gathered from sources including “Arkive.org.”

Merlin

Loading

Merlin

This is Merlin, a River Otter!

Although River Otters look cute and cuddly, they are wild and do not make good pets. They have sharp claws which can tear up carpets and furniture, and very sharp teeth, which can be dangerous. River Otters also mark their territory with “scat,” another name for waste.

River Otters are perfectly adapted to the places they live – around rivers of all sizes, canals, lakes, marshes, and bays. At one time the number of River Otters was quite low. However, due to reintroduction programs, their success in the wild is growing.

Living Shores

Loading

Living Shores

This is a Sea Urchin!

You can find Sea Urchins, and TOUCH them, in Living Shores at the Texas State Aquarium!

Several touch pools, six aquariums, and three interactive computer kiosks help the public discover the different habitats of the Laguna Madre, and Padre Island bays and estuaries. Visitors can safely interact with species such as hermit crabs, lightning whelks, and pencil urchins in our largest indoor touch pool.