Red-Bellied Piranha

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It’s a Piranha!

Did you know?
The Red-Bellied Piranha is often thought of as aggressive and ferocious, because of their sharp teeth and feeding frenzies (when a large group of Piranhas join together to strip a large item of prey within minutes). However, this behavior is not common, and is usually a result of starvation or provocation.

You can find Red-Bellied Piranhas in the Texas State Aquarium’s Amazon exhibit!

Information gathered from sources including Arkive.org.

Prehensile-Tailed Porcupine

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Prehensile-Tailed Porcupine

This is Chiquita, the Prehensile-Tailed Porcupine. You can find her in the Texas State Aquarium’s Amazon exhibit.

Did you know?
Contrary to popular belief, the Porcupine cannot shoot it’s quills. The quills are barbed, but they would have to be shoved into a predator in order to penetrate.

When a wild porcupine is provoked, it may bite and hit. But first it will warn by shaking its spines, growling, and stomping its feet.

Mata Mata Turtle

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Mata Mata Turtle

You can find the Mata Mata Turtle in the Amazon Exhibit at the Texas State Aquarium.

The Mata Mata has a long snout that it uses as a snorkel. The tip of the snout emerges from the water when breathing, allowing for minimal movement.

This Thursday is World Turtle Day! Come by the aquarium and check out all of the turtles that call the Texas State Aquarium home.

Information gathered from sources including “eol.org”.

Freshwater Stingray

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Freshwater Stingray

There is not enough information about the history and population status of the Ocellate River Stingray to determine if it is in danger of extinction, but we do know that it is used for food by native South Americans, because its preference for shallow water makes it an easy target for fishermen.

 

 

 

Information gathered from sources including “eol.org”.

Ocellate River Stingray

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Ocellate River Stingray

The Ocellate River Stingray!

This freshwater stingray is often referred to as the “Peacock-Eye Stingray” because of its distinct yellow-orange spots that resemble the eye of a peacock.

Come back every day this week for new interesting facts and photos of the Ocellate River Stingray.  You can also see this creature face-to-face here at the Texas State Aquarium’s Amazon exhibit!

 

 

 

Information gathered from sources including “eol.org.”

Ornate Horned Frog

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In honor of National Frog Day this Saturday, today’s Creature Feature is the Ornate Horned Frog, featured in the Aquarium’s Amazon exhibit.    The Ornate Horned Frog has earned the nickname “The PacMan Frog” because of it’s indiscriminate eating habits, and the size of its mouth in proportion to its body.     This frog is a camouflage expert, see if you can find him next time you visit us!